Governor Signs Stone Bill to Alleviate Jail Overcrowding

SACRAMENTO— Governor Brown has signed AB 1512 by Assemblymember Mark Stone (D-Monterey Bay), a bill that will help ease overcrowded conditions in county jails. Specifically, the measure extends existing law to allow counties to transfer sentenced inmates to another county with adequate jail space until July 1, 2018. The measure received bipartisan unanimous support in the Legislature.

“It’s important that counties have the tools to manage jail overcrowding caused by statewide prison realignment so they can better serve inmate populations and their families,” said Stone. “I am pleased that Democrats and Republicans came together to support this bill, and I wholeheartedly thank the Governor for signing this measure into law.”

Stone Introduces Bill to Boost Student Civic Education

SACRAMENTO—Assemblymember Mark Stone (D-Monterey Bay) has introduced legislation that would help high schools encourage their students to volunteer at polls.  AB 2684 would allow schools to receive credit for a student’s average daily attendance (ADA) when students volunteer at precinct polling stations on Election Day.

The state of California already recognizes that high school students receive educational benefits by volunteering at polling stations, which is why students are allowed to serve on precinct boards.  Because students have unique learning opportunities outside the classroom, the state provides ADA funds for schools when students go on field trips or do independent study.

Stone Releases Statement on State Budget Passage

SACRAMENTO — Assemblymember Mark Stone (D-Monterey Bay), Chair of the Assembly Human Services Committee, has released the following statement on the passage of the state budget:

“This balanced, on-time, fiscally responsible budget invests in public schools, makes college more affordable, and prioritizes the needs of the most vulnerable Californians. 

Stone Bill to Alleviate Jail Overcrowding Passes Legislature

SACRAMENTO— The California Legislature has unanimously passed AB 1512, legislation by Assemblymember Mark Stone (D-Monterey Bay) that would help ease overcrowded conditions in county jails. Specifically, the measure extends existing law to allow counties to transfer sentenced inmates to another county with adequate jail space until July 1, 2018. The measure now goes to the Governor’s desk.

“It’s important that counties have the tools to manage jail overcrowding caused by statewide prison realignment so they can better serve inmate populations and their families,” said Stone. “This bill will give counties time to adapt to realignment and develop space that will help make jails safer and programs that will help reduce recidivism.”

Stone Bill to Help Mobilehome Residents Approved

SACRAMENTO— The Assembly Housing and Community Development Committee has approved legislation by Assemblymember Mark Stone (D-Monterey Bay) to improve mobilehome owners’ ability to sell their homes to an eligible buyer.

“It’s important that we have protections in place to ensure that responsible and trustworthy home buyers can purchase these homes,” said Stone.  “It’s unreasonable to require that they be subject to overly-restrictive standards put in place by park management.”

Stone Honors Local Holocaust Survivor Gitta Ryle

SACRAMENTO--Assemblymember Mark Stone (D-Monterey Bay) honored Santa Cruz resident Gitta Ryle in today’s California State Assembly observance of California’s annual Holocaust Memorial Week. 

“Mrs. Ryle endured unspeakable tragedy as a child during the war.  It’s our duty to honor and remember what she, her family, and millions of others experienced,” said Stone.  “Today, she embodies the spirit of hope and triumph as she shares her story with Santa Cruz area schoolchildren.

Stone Bills to Help Needy Families Approved

SACRAMENTO—The Assembly Human Services Committee has approved two measures by Assemblymember Mark Stone (D-Monterey Bay) that would help families in crisis, while streamlining and making more cost-effective some cash aid services.  Both measures received bipartisan support, and they next go to the Assembly Appropriations Committee for consideration of their fiscal impacts to the state.

“These bills will help needy parents take care of their children’s basic needs, while relieving some of the bureaucratic burden they face,” said Stone.  “These policies are important to help ensure that the programs that families in crisis rely upon are cost-effective and user-friendly.”